As we endeavor to push forward to change the future, we must first understand the past. Colonization, slavery, segregation, apartheid, systemic racism – these experiences created a foundation of mistrust rooted in history.

Some of this history can be found here:

Here is a small sampling of formative events in U.S. history that have shaped the relationship communities of color have with medical research and the health care system. This list is by no means exhaustive, but we hope it helps pave the way for candid dialogue that guides our work on equity.

Slavery (1619 - 1730)

An illustration depicting a pair of manacles, commonly used to restrain enslaved people during slavery in the United States
Illustration by Toya Beacham. Click here to learn more about the artist.

Gynecology/​Experimentation On Enslaved Women (1845 - 1849)

An illustration depicting a black woman, whose red headband and green dress are colorized amid an otherwise black and white illustration, kneeling on a raised platform, with the profile of a white man in the foreground barely visible on the side of the image
Illustration by Toya Beacham. Click here to learn more

Closing Of Medical Schools/​Exclusion Of Future Health Providers (1870)

An illustration of a black man depicted from the shoulders down, wearing a three-piece suit, carrying a medical bag
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Birth Control Experimentation Puerto Rico (1930s - 1970s)

An illustration depicting a black Puerto Rican woman holding a young child on her lap, with another child nearby.
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The Tuskegee Experiment (1932 - 1972)

An illustration depicting a black man in common clothing of a farmer from 1930s America, centered in a group of other similarly dressed figures who are shown in outline only
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Henrietta Lacks (1951)

An illustration depicting Henrietta Lacks, wearing a suit, smiling, and with her hands on her hips
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Radioactive iodine (1956 - 1957)

An illustration of a steel barrel with a radioactive waste label, behind a medicine tablet resting on a steel tray
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1. End the Pandemic & Build a More Resilient System

Our first order of business is to end the COVID-19 pandemic. We must also prepare for the challenges ahead. To do so, we need more of the innovation and discovery that led to the vaccines and a stronger scientific delivery system from top to bottom.

We can end the current pandemic and create a more resilient health care system for the future by:

Fulfilling the Commitment

An illustration depicting a pair of manacles, commonly used to restrain enslaved people during slavery in the United States

Fulfilling the biopharmaceutical industry’s commitment to help end the pandemic by expanding collaboration and manufacturing capacity and ensuring affordability and access to COVID-19 vaccines andtherapeutics.

Gynecology/​Experimentation On Enslaved Women (1845 - 1849)

An illustration depicting a black woman, whose red headband and green dress are colorized amid an otherwise black and white illustration, kneeling on a raised platform, with the profile of a white man in the foreground barely visible on the side of the image

Fulfilling the biopharmaceutical industry’s commitment to help end the pandemic by expanding collaboration and manufacturing capacity and ensuring affordability and access to COVID-19 vaccines andtherapeutics.

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Fulfilling the biopharmaceutical industry’s commitment to help end the pandemic by expanding collaboration and manufacturing capacity and ensuring affordability and access to COVID-19 vaccines andtherapeutics.

Closing Of Medical Schools/​Exclusion Of Future Health Providers (1870)

An illustration of a black man depicted from the shoulders down, wearing a three-piece suit, carrying a medical bag

Fulfilling the biopharmaceutical industry’s commitment to help end the pandemic by expanding collaboration and manufacturing capacity and ensuring affordability and access to COVID-19 vaccines andtherapeutics.

Anti-Microbial Resistance

An illustration depicting a black Puerto Rican woman holding a young child on her lap, with another child nearby.

Fulfilling the biopharmaceutical industry’s commitment to help end the pandemic by expanding collaboration and manufacturing capacity and ensuring affordability and access to COVID-19 vaccines andtherapeutics.

2. Make Medicines More Affordable

Every reform must pass a simple test: does it benefit the patient and protect future innovation? Temporary fixes based on political rhetoric are destabilizing and counterproductive – only sustainable, patient-centered solutions will help those who need it the most. We propose policies to make medicines more affordable by:

Modernizing Medicare

An illustration depicting a pair of manacles, commonly used to restrain enslaved people during slavery in the United States

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

Make Insurance Work

An illustration depicting a black woman, whose red headband and green dress are colorized amid an otherwise black and white illustration, kneeling on a raised platform, with the profile of a white man in the foreground barely visible on the side of the image

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

Protect The Safety Net

An illustration of a black man depicted from the shoulders down, wearing a three-piece suit, carrying a medical bag

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

End Incentives

An illustration depicting a black Puerto Rican woman holding a young child on her lap, with another child nearby.

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

2. Make Medicines More Affordable

Every reform must pass a simple test: does it benefit the patient and protect future innovation? Temporary fixes based on political rhetoric are destabilizing and counterproductive – only sustainable, patient-centered solutions will help those who need it the most. We propose policies to make medicines more affordable by:

Improving Clinical Trial Diversity

An illustration depicting a pair of manacles, commonly used to restrain enslaved people during slavery in the United States

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

Invest in Data

An illustration depicting a black woman, whose red headband and green dress are colorized amid an otherwise black and white illustration, kneeling on a raised platform, with the profile of a white man in the foreground barely visible on the side of the image

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

Invest in Data

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Invest in Data

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Promote Best Practices

An illustration of a black man depicted from the shoulders down, wearing a three-piece suit, carrying a medical bag

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

Align With Equity Goals

An illustration depicting a black Puerto Rican woman holding a young child on her lap, with another child nearby.

Modernizing how Medicare covers and pays for medicines, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D, lowering cost sharing and spreading those costs over the calendar year, and making sure the savings negotiated with health plans are passed to patients. It also includes implementing a market-based adjustment in Part B that would allow the government and seniors to benefit from more of the savings already negotiated in the commercial market, which could save some seniors hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars each year

Invest in Data

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[List Empty Click Here to Add]